Michigan State University Libraries
Special Collections Division
Reading Room Index to the Comic Art Collection
"An Asterix Adventure" to "Astérix aux Jeux Olympiques"

Back to the A index screen
Back to the A to Z index screen
Back up the list

-----------------------------------------------------

An Asterix Adventure

A series designation given on some of the English-language printings of Astérix. For convenience, a list of the main Asterix titles in English is given here:
  1. Asterix the Gaul
  2. Asterix and the Golden Sickle
  3. Asterix and the Goths
  4. Asterix the Gladiator
  5. Asterix and the Banquet
  6. Asterix and Cleopatra
  7. Asterix and the Big Fight
  8. Asterix in Britain
  9. Asterix and the Normans
  10. Asterix the Legionary
  11. Asterix and the Chieftain's Shield
  12. Asterix at the Olympic Games
  13. Asterix and the Cauldron
  14. Asterix in Spain
  15. Asterix and the Roman Agent
  16. Asterix in Switzerland
  17. The Mansions of the Gods
  18. Asterix and the Laurel Wreath
  19. Asterix and the Soothsayer
  20. Asterix in Corsica
  21. Asterix and Caesar's Gift
  22. Asterix and the Great Crossing
  23. Obelix and Co.
  24. Asterix in Belgium
  25. Asterix and the Great Divide
  26. Asterix and the Black Gold
  27. Asterix and Son
  28. Asterix and the Magic Carpet
  29. Asterix and the Secret Weapon
  30. Asterix and Obelix All at Sea
  31. Asterix and the Actress
    and movie adaptations in translation:
  32. Asterix Conquers America
  33. Asterix Versus Caesar
  34. Operation Getafix
  35. The Twelve Tasks of Asterix
-----------------------------------------------------
An Asterix Adventure.
   Goscinny and Uderzo present Asterix and the Vikings : the
   Book of the Film / translated by Anthea Bell. -- London :
   Orion, 2006. -- 64 p. : col. ill. ; 29 cm. -- (An Asterix
   Adventure ; 34) -- Translation of: Astérix et les Vikings.
   -- "Meet Chief Timandahaf the Viking, his fierce warriors
   and his daughter Abba, as Asterix and Obelix do when the
   Vikings visit Gaul to learn the meaning of fear. For they
   believe fear will lend them wings, and they'd love to fly.
   Carried off to the frozen North, trendy young Justforkix
   from Lutetia claims to know all about it. But will he or
   someone else put the Vikings to flight?" -- Call no.:
   PN6747.U3V513 2006
-----------------------------------------------------
An Asterix Adventure.
   The Mansions of the Gods / text by Goscinny ; drawings by
   Uderzo ; translated by Anthea Bell and Derek Hockridge. --
   Montréal : Dargaud Canada, 1981. -- 47 p. : col. ill. ; 29
   cm. -- (An Asterix Adventure) -- Translation of: Le Domaine
   des Dieux. -- Call no.: PN6747.U3A8713 1981
-----------------------------------------------------
An Asterix Adventure.
   Obelix and Co. / text by Goscinny ; drawings by Uderzo ;
   translated by Anthea Bell and Derek Hockridge. -- London :
   Hodder Dargaud, 1980. -- 48 p. : col. ill. ; 30 cm. -- (An
   Asterix Adventure) -- Translation of: Obelix et Compagnie.
   -- Call no.: PN6747.U3A9313 1980
-----------------------------------------------------
An Asterix Adventure.
   Obelix and Co. / text by Goscinny ; drawings by Uderzo ;
   translated by Anthea Bell and Derek Hockridge. -- Montreal
   : Dargaud Canada, 1981. -- 48 p. : col. ill. ; 29 cm. --
   (An Asterix Adventure) -- Call no.: PN6747.U3A9313 1981
-----------------------------------------------------
An Asterix Adventure.
   Operation Getafix : the book of the film : Goscinny and
   Uderzo present an Asterix adventure / translated by Anthea
   Bell and Derek Hockridge. -- London : Hodder and Stoughton,
   1990. -- 47 p. : col. ill. ; 29 cm. -- (Asterix ; bk. 31)
   -- Based on the film Asterix and the Big Fight (Le Coup du
   Menhir) "written by Yannik Voigt from the books Asterix and
   the Soothsayer and Asterix and the Big Fight." -- Format is
   text illustrated with cels from the animated film. -- Call
   no.: PN6747.G6C7513 1990
-----------------------------------------------------
An Asterix Adventure.
   René Goscinny and Albert Uderzo present The Twelve Tasks of
   Asterix / based on the cartoon film created by Studio
   Idefix. -- Montreal : Dargaud Canada, 1981. -- 56 p. : col.
   ill. ; 29 cm. -- Les 12 Travaux d'Astérix. -- Call no.:
   PN6747.U3D613 1981
-----------------------------------------------------
Asterix als Gladiator / Text: Goscinny ; Zeichnungen: Uderzo.
   -- Stuttgart : Ehapa-Verlag, 1971. -- 48 p. : col. ill. ;
   29 cm. -- (Grosser Asterix ; Bd. 3) -- Translation of:
   Astérix Gladiateur. -- Call no.: PN6747.U3A7415 1971
-----------------------------------------------------
Asterix als Gladiator / Text von Rene Goscinny ; Zeichnungen
   von Albert Uderzo ; Übersetzung aus dem Französischen:
   Gudrun Penndorf. -- Berlin : Egmont EHAPA, 2001. -- 48 p. :
   col. ill. ; 29 cm. -- (Asterix ; Bd. 3) -- Translation of:
   Astérix Gladiateur. -- Call no.: PN6747.U3A7415 2001
-----------------------------------------------------
Asterix als Legionär / Text, Goscinny ; Zeichnungen, Uderzo.
   -- Stuttgart : EHAPA, 1971. -- 48 p. : col. ill. ; 29 cm.
   -- (Grosser Asterix ; Bd. 10) -- Translation of: Astérix
   Légionnaire. -- Call no.: PN6747.U3A8015 1971
-----------------------------------------------------
Asterix als Politklamauk.
   "Bonnhalla am Rhein : Asterix als Politklamauk" / von
   Eckart Sackmann. p. 128-139 in Deutsche Comicforschung, Bd.
   3 (2007). -- Begins: "Solange Comics nicht als Literatur,
   sondern lediglich als Ware angesehen wurden, ging man
   entsprechend willkürlich mit ihnen um. Comics waren
   'Material', das sich redaktionell beliebig formen liess.
   Die Einführung von 'Astérix' durch Kauka is ein Beispiel
   dafür, wie einer Serie der Zeitgeist aufgepfropft wurde."
   -- Call no.: PN6755.D4 Bd.3
-----------------------------------------------------

Asterix and Caesar's Gift

Asterix and Caesar's Gift / text by Goscinny ; drawings by Uderzo ; translated by Anthea Bell and Derek Hockridge. -- Montreal : Dargaud Canada, 1978. -- 48 p. : col. ill. ; 29 cm. -- Translation of: Le Cadeau de César (1972). -- For a list of English-language Asterix titles see An Asterix Adventure. -- Call no.: PN6747.U3A9113 1978

Summary: A small cohort of Legionnaires has finished its twenty years of service, and as is Caesar's custom each man is given a small plot of land in the colonies. One of the men, named Tremensdelirious, is constantly drunk and undeserving, but Caesar decides to have some fun by giving him a little Gaulish village on the Armorican coast, the village of Asterix. On the way to visit his holdings, Tremensdelirious runs out of money and trades his certificate to an innkeeper named Orthopaedix for a few drinks and a piece of bread. Orthopaedix can't believe his luck, sells his inn, and heads for the coast. The natives are unimpressed with the legal document, but allow the new family to move in next to the fishmonger and set up an inn. Soon the wives of Orthopaedix and Chief Vitalstatistix get into a feud, and an election is called. The wives campaign to get their respective husbands elected Chief, and the result is a lot of bad political feeling among the villagers. Tremensdelirious turns up wanting his village back, and since Caesar's grants are not transferrable the local garrison is called in to enforce his ownership. The Romans attack with the new technology of catapults and an assault tower, and though the attack interrupts the political debate the Romans have no more success than usual. Orthopaedix decides to leave, and everybody makes friends again.

This summary is from European Comics in English Translation (Jefferson, NC : McFarland & Company, 2002). Used with permission.


Another English-language edition:
Asterix and Caesar's Gift / text by Goscinny ; drawings by Uderzo ; translated by Anthea Bell and Derek Hockridge. -- London : Hodder and Stoughton, 1978. -- 48 p. : col. ill. ; 29 cm. -- Translation of: Le Cadeau de César. -- "Book 19". -- Call no.: PN6747.U3A9113 1978b
-----------------------------------------------------

Asterix and Cleopatra

Asterix and Cleopatra / text by Goscinny, drawings by Uderzo, translated by Anthea Bell and Derek Hockridge. -- Leicester : Brockhampton Press, 1969. -- 48 p. : col. ill. ; 30 cm. -- (An Asterix Adventure) -- Translation of: Astérix et Cléopatra. -- Call no.: PN6747.U3A7613 1969

Summary: Caesar taunts Cleopatra saying that the Egyptians are decadent. Cleopatra says she'll show him they're not by building a palace, and Caesar says he'll believe it when she sees it. Cleopatra calls in Edifis, the architect, and gives him three months to do the job. Edifis knows he needs magic, so he travels to Gaul to get help from Getafix the Druid. Getafix needs to check something in the library at Alexandria, so he decides to go to Egypt and help. Asterix and Obelix go too, and also the puppy Dogmatix. Soon construction is going along very well with the help of the magic potion that Getafix brews for the workers. There are labor problems, stirred up by a rival architect named Artifis, who also tries to interrupt the supply of stones. The Gauls get locked in the labyrinthine interior of a pyramid at one point, and Dogmatix rescues them. Artifis has a poisoned cake delivered to Cleopatra in the name of the Gauls, and that gets them put in the dungeon. In the end, even Caesar tries to sabotage the project by attacking the work site with an army. The Romans, as ever, are no match for the three Gauls, and the building is completed on time.

This summary is from European Comics in English Translation (Jefferson, NC : McFarland & Company, 2002). Used with permission.


Other English-language editions:
Asterix and Cleopatra / text by Goscinny ; drawings by Uderzo ; translated by Anthea Bell and Derek Hockridge. -- London : Hodder Dargaud, 1973. -- 48 p. : col. ill. ; 29 cm. -- (Asterix ; bk. 4) -- "The greatest story ever drawn." -- Call no.: PN6747.U3A7613 1973

Asterix and Cleopatra / text by Goscinny ; drawings by Uderzo ; translated by Anthea Bell and Derek Hockridge. -- Montreal : Dargaud Canada, 1981. -- 48 p. : col. ill. ; 30 cm. -- (An Asterix Adventure) -- Call no.: PN6747.U3A7613 1981

Asterix and Cleopatra / text by Goscinny ; drawings by Uderzo ; translated by Anthea Bell and Derek Hockridge. -- 2nd ed. -- Greenwich, Conn. : Dargaud Publishing International, 1984. -- 48 p. : col. ill. ; 29 cm. -- (An Asterix Adventure) -- Call no.: PN6747.U3A7613 1984


-----------------------------------------------------

Asterix & Obelix

Newspaper comic strip
-----------------------------------------------------
Asterix & Obelix (July 15, 1978)
   "A Hunting Primer"* (Asterix & Obelix, July 15, 1978) /
   Uderzo & Goscinny. -- Summary: The Indian chief uses a
   painted hide to begin the education of Asterix and Obelix.
   -- Call no.: PN6745.B8 1980
-----------------------------------------------------
Asterix & Obelix (July 17, 1978)
   "You're the One Who's Not Hip, Obelix!"* (Asterix & Obelix,
   July 17, 1978) / Uderzo & Goscinny. -- Summary: A lady is
   walking seductively, and Obelix wonders if she has hip
   troubles. -- Call no.: PN6745.B8 1980
-----------------------------------------------------
Asterix & Obelix (July 18, 1978)
   "I Wish I Understood Iberian"* (Asterix & Obelix, July 18,
   1978) / Uderzo & Goscinny. -- Summary: The chief puts his
   daughter's hand in Obelix's, and Obelix doesn't understand.
   -- Call no.: PN6745.B8 1980
-----------------------------------------------------
Asterix & Obelix (July 19, 1978)
   "I'm Too Young to Tie"* (Asterix & Obelix, July 19, 1978) /
   Uderzo & Goscinny. -- Summary: Obelix finds out he's
   engaged to be married. -- Call no.: PN6745.B8 1980
-----------------------------------------------------
Asterix & Obelix (July 20, 1978)
   "We'll Slip Away in the Dark"* (Asterix & Obelix, July 20,
   1978) / Uderzo & Goscinny. -- Summary: Asterix & Obelix
   make plans to escape the Indian village. -- Call no.:
   PN6745.B8 1980
-----------------------------------------------------
Asterix & Obelix (July 21, 1978)
   "Who Made That Crack?"* (Asterix & Obelix, July 21, 1978) /
   Uderzo & Goscinny. -- Summary: Asterix steps on a stick
   while trying to sneak by the late shift of Indian guards.
   -- Call no.: PN6745.B8 1980
-----------------------------------------------------
Asterix & Obelix (July 22, 1978)
   "Just Another Turkey"* (Asterix & Obelix, July 22, 1978) /
   Uderzo & Goscinny. -- Summary: Obelix makes a gobbling
   sound and fools the Indian guard. -- Call no.: PN6745.B8
   1980
-----------------------------------------------------
Asterix & Obelix (July 24, 1978)
   "Out of the Frying Pan Into the Smorgasbord"* (Asterix &
   Obelix, July 24, 1978) / Uderzo & Goscinny. -- Summary:
   Asterix and Obelix encounter the Scandinavian Navy. -- Call
   no.: PN6745.B8 1980
-----------------------------------------------------
Asterix & Obelix (July 25, 1978)
   "Yøu've Been Plåying the Støck Mårket Tøø Løng!"* (Asterix
   & Obelix, July 25, 1978) / Uderzo & Goscinny. -- Summary:
   Great Danish (the dog) smells land, but Peer Dimlisen is
   afraid of falling off the edge of the wørld. -- Call no.:
   PN6745.B8 1980
-----------------------------------------------------
Asterix & Obelix (July 26, 1978)
   "Why Tåke the Chånce øf Fålling Øff?"* (Asterix & Obelix,
   July 26, 1978) / Uderzo & Goscinny. -- Summary: The
   Scandinavian Navy knows the world is round, but votes to
   turn back anyhow. -- Call no.: PN6745.B8 1980
-----------------------------------------------------
Asterix & Obelix (Oct. 8, 1978)
   "It Must Be a Crab-Apple Tree"* (Asterix & Obelix, Oct 8,
   1978) / Uderzo & Goscinny. -- Plates 18-19 of Asterix and
   the Big Fight (Le Combat des Chefs) edited for distribution
   as a Sunday page in the Edmonton Journal Comic Book, v. 1,
   no. 38 (Oct. 7, 1978). -- Summary: A Roman corporal (in the
   albums called Plutoqueprévus in French and Infirmofpurpus
   in English) is pried from a cauldron and sent to spy on the
   Gauls disguised as a tree. -- Call no.: PN6732.E37v.1no.38
-----------------------------------------------------

Asterix and Obelix All at Sea

Asterix and Obelix All at Sea / written and illustrated by Uderzo ; translated by Anthea Bell and Derek Hockridge. -- London : Hodder & Stoughton, 1996. -- 48 p. : col. ill. ; 29 cm. -- (Asterix ; bk. 35) -- Translation of: La Galère d'Obelix. -- For a list of English-language Asterix titles see An Asterix Adventure. -- Call no.: PN6747.U3A99213 1996

Summary: Caesar's personal galley has been taken by a handful of mutineers. Unable to agree on a destination, they head for the Gaulish village they've heard is holding out against the Romans. Meanwhile in the village, Obelix has drunk a cauldron of the magic potion and turned to granite. Nor Getafix's potions, nor Impedimenta's cooking, nor Panacea's kisses will break the spell. When the mutineers arrive, the Gauls welcome them and carry the galley into the village. Obelix comes to life, but has reverted to childhood. He can only eat one boar at a time, and can't lift menhirs. The Romans take him hostage and head for Rome, and the Gauls brew a batch of potion, put Caesar's galley back in the water, and give chase with the help of the mutineers. After the rescue is complete, the Gauls give Caesar's galley to needy pirates and take the other Roman galley. Getafix decides they should go to Atlantis to look for a cure for Obelix's condition. In Atlantis, most of the population is young children who were once adults. The Atlanteans know the secret of rejuvenation and eternal youth, but not how to make people older. The mutineers decide to stay. Meanwhile the pirates are on the way to Rome using Romans as oarsmen, hoping to get ransom for their galley. They discover that the Gauls have left a barrel of the magic potion behind in Caesar's galley. The Roman admiral drinks it and turns to stone. Finally arriving in Rome, the galley is destroyed by coastal defenses because it's flying a pirate flag. On their own captured galley, the Gauls are helpless against another attacking Roman galley, and Asterix is captured. This frightens Obelix, and he spontaneously regains his full strength and girth, defeats the attackers, and rows the galley home.

This summary is from European Comics in English Translation (Jefferson, NC : McFarland & Company, 2002). Used with permission.

-----------------------------------------------------
Asterix & Obelix Take on Caesar [videorecording] / starring
   Gérard Depardieu, Christian Clavier, Robert Benigni ; dir.
   by Claude Zidi. -- Pathé, 2001. -- 1 dvd-video (106 min) :
   kleur, geluid, dolby-surround. -- Summary: De Gallische
   vrienden Asterix en Obelix vechten tegen het leger van
   Julius Caesar in het jaar 50 voor Christus. -- Videoversie
   van de gelijknamige speelfilm. -- Frankrijk, Duitsland,
   Italië : Katharina Renn Productions [etc.], cop. 1999. --
   Naar de stripverhalen van Albert Uderzo en René Goscinny.
   -- Engels gesproken, niet ondertiteld. -- Call no.:
   PN6747.U3F5 2001
-----------------------------------------------------

Asterix and Son

Asterix and Son / written and illustrated by Uderzo ; translated by Anthea Bell and Derek Hockridge. -- London : Hodder and Stoughton, 1985. -- 48 p. : col. ill. ; 30 cm. -- (An Asterix Adventure) -- Translation of: Le Fils d'Astérix. -- Call no.: PN6747.U3A9713 1985

Summary: A baby wrapped in Roman blankets is mysteriously left on the doorstep of Asterix and Obelix's hut. In the struggle to cope with the responsibilities of child care, Obelix manages to feed him a half-bottle of magic potion. The baby becomes a force to be reckoned with, using cows for rattles, etc. The Gauls investigate all the neighboring Roman outposts but can't find the baby's parents. Brutus, the adopted son of Caesar, wants the baby and sends a peddler and a nursemaid undercover to get him, but it doesn't work. Brutus then burns the village to the ground and steals the baby, escaping on a pirate ship. Asterix and Obelix bring them back, and Caesar shows up to see what's going on. Then Cleopatra shows up to explain that the baby is Caesars's son (and hers) and that she left him with the Gauls to protect them from Brutus. Since the village has been burned down, the closing banquet is held on Cleopatra's Galley.

This summary is from European Comics in English Translation (Jefferson, NC : McFarland & Company, 2002). Used with permission.

-----------------------------------------------------

Asterix and the Actress

Asterix and the Actress / written and illustrated by Uderzo ; translated by Anthea Bell and Derek Hockridge. -- London : Orion, 2001. -- 48 p. : col. ill. ; 30 cm. -- (An Asterix Adventure) -- Translation of: Astérix et Latraviata. -- Call no.: PN6747.U3A99313 2001

Summary: Asterix and Obelix return from a hunt to a surprise birthday party in the village, celebrating their mutual birthday. Their mothers, Sarsaparilla and Vanilla, have come to visit. Their fathers, Obeliscodix and Astronomix, plan to join them later because they can't leave their souvenir business in Condatum just now. While the mothers are nudging the boys about getting married, the fathers go for a beer after work. While the dads are at the bar, the Romans ransack the souvenir shop looking for a sword and helmet sold to Astronomix and Obeliscodix by Tremensdelirius, but the sword and helmet have already been sent to Obelix and Asterix as birthday presents. It develops that the sword and helmet were stolen from one Pompey, currently in Gaul to raise an army against Julius Caesar. While the mothers are parading eligible girls past their sons, the dads are in jail with Tremensdelirius. In Condatum, Pompey learns where his property is, but doesn't want to approach the surrounded village because that might alert Caesar to his presence in Gaul. He sends a Roman actress named Latraviata to the village, disguised to impersonate Panacea. The plan is that Obelix's long-standing crush on Panacea will make him lower his guard so Latraviata can recover the sword and helmet, and the plan works. Then Asterix and Obelix decide to go to Condatum to check up on their missing fathers, and hitch a ride in Latraviata's cart. Meanwhile, in Condatum, Tragicomix and the real Panacea realize that the two older Gauls are in trouble, so they head for the coast to get Asterix and Obelix. The two parties meet on the road, and the actress and her plot are soon uncovered. The dads are freed, and Julius Caesar rides in just in time to take care of Pompey.

Bibliography: "Not Quite the Worst Asterix Album" / by David Groenewegen. p. 49-50 in The Comics Journal, no. 245 (Aug. 2002). -- (Reviews) -- Reviews Albert Uderzo's Asterix and the Actress. -- Call no.: PN6700.C62no.245
-----------------------------------------------------

Asterix and the Banquet

Asterix and the Banquet / text by Goscinny ; drawings by Uderzo ; translated by Anthea Bell and Derek Hockridge. -- Montreal : Dargaud Canada, 1980. -- 48 p. : col. ill. ; 29 cm. -- (An Asterix Adventure) -- Translation of: Le Tour de Gaule d'Asterix. -- Call no.: PN6747.U3A7513 1980

Summary: A new officer arrives from Rome to take care of the Gaul problem, and after seeing how impossible it is to attack the village of Asterix, decides to build a stockade around the whole thing. The idea is to isolate them so their spirit won't infect the rest of Gaul. The stockade isn't taken very seriously by the Gauls, and Asterix himself makes a wager with the Roman. He bets that he can travel all around Gaul, collecting the best foods from each area, and return to invite the Roman to a banquet featuring everything he's gathered. The deed is done, making the album a comic travelogue of Roman-era France. A little dog joins Asterix and Obelix in Paris (on page 12), follows them faithfully, and isn't noticed until the last page.

This summary is from European Comics in English Translation (Jefferson, NC : McFarland & Company, 2002). Used with permission.
Another Summary: Astérix and Obelix travel around Gaul collecting local specialties for a banquet. Although without bicycles, the trip has the form of the Tour de France, with some allusions to the race.


Another English-language edition:
Asterix and the Banquet / text by Goscinny ; drawings by Uderzo ; translated by Anthea Bell and Derek Hockridge. -- London : Hodder Dargaud, 1981. -- 48 p. : col. ill. ; 29 cm. -- (Asterix ; bk. 23) -- Translation of: Le Tour de Gaule d'Astérix. -- Call no.: PN6747.U3A7513 1981
-----------------------------------------------------

Asterix and the Big Fight

Asterix and the Big Fight / text by Goscinny ; drawings by Uderzo ; translated by Anthea Bell and Derek Hockridge. -- London : Hodder and Stoughton, 1974. -- 48 p. : col. ill. ; 30 cm. -- Translation of: Le Combat des Chefs. -- "Book 9". -- For a list of English-language Asterix titles see An Asterix Adventure. -- Call no.: PN6747.U3A7713 1974

Summary: The Romans learn of a Gaulish custom called "the big fight," in which one chieftain challenges another to one-on-one combat and the loser's tribe has to swear allegiance to the winning chieftain. The chieftain of Asterix's village, Vitalstatistix, is a powerful fighter, but the Romans assume he could be beaten if deprived of his magic potion. A Gaulish collaborator chieftain named Cassius Ceramix is also a powerful fighter, and the Romans would like him to challenge and defeat Vitalstatistix. A patrol is sent out to capture the Druid Getafix, so that he won't be able to make any more potion. Unfortunately Obelix, in trying to defend Getafix from the patrol, drops a menhir on the Druid and thereby deprives him of his memory. A menhir, for the uninitiated, is a standing stone of monumental size that Obelix happens to be carrying. Getafix the Druid can no longer produce magic potion. Cassius Ceramix delivers his challenge, and the fight is scheduled. Psychoanalytix, a Druid from a nearby village, is recruited to help heal Getafix. Psychoanalytix asks what happened, and Obelix shows him by dropping another menhir. The two Druids are now equally dotty, and enjoy brewing random potions most of which cause changes in skin color. In despair, Asterix starts helping Vitalstatistix train for the fight. On the day of the fight, Getafix accidentally brews a potion that cures him, and gets busy making a batch of magic potion. A supply is sent to the arena and shared out among the Gauls, but Vitalstatistix is sufficiently invigorated by the news of Getafix's recovery to defeat Cassius Ceramix under his own power. The Romans have planned for this, and the Legions attack the Gauls. Though outnumbered a hundred to one, the Gauls defeat the Romans with disappointing swiftness. In the fighting Obelix drops another menhir on the puppet chieftain Cassius Ceramix, who loses his memory permanently. Psychoanalytix is likewise never cured, but both are able to continue their occupations with apparent success.

This summary is from European Comics in English Translation (Jefferson, NC : McFarland & Company, 2002). Used with permission.


Another English-language edition:
Asterix and the Big Fight / text by Goscinny ; drawings by Uderzo ; translated by Anthea Bell and Derek Hockridge. -- Montreal : Dargaud Canada, 1981. -- 48 p. : col. ill. ; 29 cm. -- Translation of: Le Combat des Chefs. -- Call no.: PN6747.U3A7713 1981
-----------------------------------------------------
Asterix and the Big Fight.
   "It Must Be a Crab-Apple Tree"* (Asterix & Obelix, Oct 8,
   1978) / Uderzo & Goscinny. -- Plates 18-19 of Asterix and
   the Big Fight (Le Combat des Chefs) edited for distribution
   as a Sunday page in the Edmonton Journal Comic Book, v. 1,
   no. 38 (Oct. 7, 1978). -- Summary: A Roman corporal (in the
   albums called Plutoqueprévus in French and Infirmofpurpus
   in English) is pried from a cauldron and sent to spy on the
   Gauls disguised as a tree. -- Call no.: PN6732.E37v.1no.38
-----------------------------------------------------
Asterix and the Big Fight.
   Operation Getafix : the Book of the Film : Goscinny and
   Uderzo present an Asterix adventure / translated by Anthea
   Bell and Derek Hockridge. -- London : Hodder and Stoughton,
   1990. -- 47 p. : col. ill. ; 29 cm. -- (Asterix ; book 31)
   -- Based on the film Asterix and the Big Fight (Le Coup du
   Menhir) "written by Yannik Voigt from the books Asterix and
   the Soothsayer and Asterix and the Big Fight." -- Format is
   text illustrated with cels from the animated film. -- Call
   no.: PN6747.U3C613 1990
-----------------------------------------------------

Asterix and the Black Gold

Asterix and the Black Gold / written and illustrated by Uderzo ; translated by Anthea Bell and Derek Hockridge. -- London : Hodder and Stoughton, 1982. -- 48 p. : col. ill. ; 30 cm. -- Translation of: L'Odyssée d'Astérix. -- For a list of English-language Asterix titles see An Asterix Adventure. -- Call no.: PN6747.U3A9613 1982

Summary: Caesar hires a renegade Druid named Dubbelosix to go undercover and get the secret of the magic potion used by the little holdout village of Armorican Gauls. Meanwhile Getafix the Druid is anxiously waiting for a shipment of rock oil he has ordered through the merchant Ekonomikrisis. Rock oil, or "petra oleum" as the Romans say, is an ingredient of the magic potion, and the supply has run out. When he learns that Ekonomikrisis has forgotten the oil, Getafix has a stroke and loses consciousness. Dubbelosix happens by, and effects a cure which ingratiates him somewhat with the village, though he seems a suspicious character at the same time. Asterix, Obelix, and Dubbelosix take ship with Ekonomikrisis to go to Mesopotamia for some rock oil, with Dubbelosix planning to sabotage the enterprise. Dubbelosix sends messages to Rome on micro-papyrus, carried by a homing fly, so that the Romans know where to wait for the Gauls. This doesn't slow them down, however, until they get to Tyre where the Romans have blockaded the entire harbor. The ship has to land in Palestine where, by order of Caesar, all supplies of rock oil have been destroyed. The Gauls set off through the desert toward Babylon, but Dogmatix digs a hole on the way and strikes oil. With a container of the stuff in hand, they go to Tyre where all merchant ships have been sunk by order of Caesar. They steal Caesar's flagship and head for home. Almost there, the oil gets lost overboard in a struggle with Dubbelosix, thus polluting the English Channel for the first time. When they get home, all is not lost. Getafix has found a locally-available, renewable substitute for rock oil. Asterix gift-wraps Dubbelosix in his own trick collapsible chariot and sends him back to Caesar.

This summary is from European Comics in English Translation (Jefferson, NC : McFarland & Company, 2002). Used with permission.

-----------------------------------------------------

Asterix and the Cauldron

Asterix and the Cauldron / text by Goscinny ; drawings by Uderzo ; translated by Anthea Bell and Derek Hockridge. -- London : Hodder & Stoughton, 1976. -- 48 p. : col. ill. ; 30 cm. -- "A Dargaud presentation". -- Translation of: Astérix et le Chaudron. -- For a list of English-language Asterix titles see An Asterix Adventure. -- Call no.: PN6747.U3A8313 1976

Summary: The chief of a neighboring Gaulish village brings a soup cauldron of money to the village of Asterix, hoping to protect it from the Roman tax collectors. The next morning the cauldron is found empty in Asterix's hut, and to regain his honor Asterix must refill it. This involves travel. Asterix and Obelix visit Roman outposts, consider selling the stories of their adventures, and take wild boars to market, with no financial success. They try teaching tricks to Dogmatix, fighting as gladiators, acting, and betting at the races. Finally they try a bank robbery, but the tax collectors have already taken all the money. On the way home they run into a tax collector, who has just enough money to fill the cauldron. In fact, it's the same money because it smells like soup. The neighbor chieftain had been dishonest with them and had stolen the money back, hoping Asterix would find different money to repay him with.

This summary is from European Comics in English Translation (Jefferson, NC : McFarland & Company, 2002). Used with permission.


Another English-language edition:
Asterix and the Cauldron / text by Goscinny ; drawings by Uderzo ; translated by Anthea Bell and Derek Hockridge. -- Greenwich, Conn. : Dargaud Publishing International, 1984. -- 48 p. : col. ill. ; 29 cm. -- Translation of: Astérix et le Chaudron. -- Call no.: PN6747.U3A8313 1984
-----------------------------------------------------

Asterix and the Chieftain's Shield

Asterix and the Chieftain's Shield / text by Goscinny ; drawings by Uderzo ; translated by Anthea Bell and Derek Hockridge. -- Montréal : Dargaud Canada, 1981. -- 48 p. : col. ill. ; 29 cm. -- Translation of: Le Bouclier Arverne. -- For a list of English-language Asterix titles see An Asterix Adventure. -- Call no.: PN6747.U3A8113 1981

Summary: When Caesar completed his conquest of Gaul, and Vercingetorix threw down his arms, it seems souvenir hunters took them away. Now Caesar wants to stage a triumph to show the Gauls who's boss, and he wants to be carried on the shield of Vercingetorix. Tribune Noxius Vapus is sent to find the shield. Meanwhile Asterix and Obelix have taken their chief, Vitalstatistix, to a spa for a liver ailment, and they end up joining the search for the shield. The way is not straight, and involves spies, big business, and much hiding in charcoal bins. In the end it develops that the shield Vitalstatistix is always being carried around on is that very same shield of Vercingetorix, and the Gauls stage a triumph with it for Caesar's benefit.

This summary is from European Comics in English Translation (Jefferson, NC : McFarland & Company, 2002). Used with permission.

-----------------------------------------------------
Asterix and the Class Act / written by René Goscinny and
   Albert Uderzo ; illustrated by Albert Uderzo ; translated
   by Anthea Bell and Derek Hockridge. -- London : Orion
   Media, 2003. -- 48 p. : col. ill. ; 29 cm. -- "Fourteen
   all-new Asterix stories." -- Translation from the French
   of: Astérix et la Rentrée Gauloise. -- Call no.:
   PN6747.U3A99413 2003
-----------------------------------------------------
Asterix and the Falling Sky / written and illustrated by
   Albert Uderzo ; translated by Anthea Bell and Derek
   Hockridge. -- London : Orion, 2005. -- 47 p. : col. ill. ;
   30 cm. -- Translation of: Le Ciel lui Tombe sur la Tête. --
   At head of title: Goscinny and Uderzo present an Asterix
   adventure. -- "The Gauls have only one fear: that the sky
   may fall on their heads tomorrow. But tomorrow never comes,
   says chief Vitalstatistix. Or does it? It looks as if it's
   come at last for Asterix, Obelix and the other villagers.
   And some surprising new characters fall along with the sky.
   Our friends soon find themselves in the middle of a space
   race..." -- Call no.: PN6747.U3A99513 2005
-----------------------------------------------------

Asterix and the Golden Sickle

Asterix and the Golden Sickle / text by Goscinny ; drawings by Uderzo ; translated by Anthea Bell and Derek Hockridge. -- London : Hodder & Stoughton, 1975. -- 48 p. : col. ill. ; 30 cm. -- Translation of: La Serpe d'Or. -- For a list of English-language Asterix titles see An Asterix Adventure. -- Call no.: PN6747.U3A7213 1975

Summary: Getafix the Druid breaks his sickle, and Asterix and Obelix volunteer to go get a new one from Metallurgix in Lutetia. Once they get to the city, Metallurgix can't be found and they are arrested by Romans. While in captivity they learn that a gang of sickle-traffickers has had a monopoly since Metallurgix disappeared. The pair decide that Metallurgix has been kidnapped by the gang, set out to look for him, and get arrested again. A clue from a fellow prisoner leads them to leave the jail again and go to the Bois de Boulogne, where they find an underground chamber full of golden sickles, and beat up the gang. They still haven't found Metallurgix, and don't know who the big boss of the gang is. More searching, and they get arrested again. This time they discover that the Roman Prefect is the boss of the gang, and the Metallurgix is being held in the same building as they are. They free Metallurgix, get a free sickle, and return home.

This summary is from European Comics in English Translation (Jefferson, NC : McFarland & Company, 2002). Used with permission.


Another English-language edition:
Asterix and the Golden Sickle / text by Goscinny ; drawings by Uderzo ; translated by Anthea Bell and Derek Hockridge. -- Montreal : Dargaud Canada, 1981. -- 48 p. : col. ill. ; 29 cm. -- Translation of: La Serpe d'Or. -- Call no.: PN6747.U3A7213 1981
-----------------------------------------------------

Asterix and the Goths

Asterix and the Goths / text by Goscinny ; drawings by Uderzo ; translated by Anthea Bell and Derek Hockridge. -- London : Hodder & Stoughton, 1977. -- 47 p. : col. ill. ; 20 cm. -- "Knight Books". -- Translation of: Astérix et les Goths. -- For a list of English-language Asterix titles see An Asterix Adventure. -- Call no.: PN6747.U3 A7313 1977

Summary: Asterix and Obelix escort Getafix to the annual Druid's convention. Getafix wins the new tricks competition and is named Druid of the Year. Goths who have sneaked over from Germania then kidnap Getafix and take him home. They try to get some secrets of military value out of Getafix, but are not successful. Coming to the rescue, Asterix and Obelix end up imprisoned and scheduled for execution along with Getafix and Rhetoric, their wimpy Gothic-Gaulish interpreter. As a last request they ask for ingredients to make a Gaulish soup, which is of course the magic potion. Since their concern is not only to escape, but also to neutralize Germania for centuries to come, they feed the soup to Rhetoric. Rhetoric declares himself chief. Then the Gauls give swigs of potion to a whole succession of henpecked or otherwise dissatisfied Gothic men, who all raise armies and declare themselves supreme chiefs. That mischief done, our friends return to their village in Gaul for a victory feast.

This summary is from European Comics in English Translation (Jefferson, NC : McFarland & Company, 2002). Used with permission.

-----------------------------------------------------
Asterix and the Goths.
   Asterix the Hero / Goscinny and Uderzo ; translated from
   the French by Anthea Bell and Derek Hockridge. -- London :
   Hodder Dargaud, 1995. -- 95 p. : col. ill. ; 29 cm. --
   Contents: Asterix and the Goths ; Asterix the Gladiator. --
   Call no.: PN6747.U3 A7313 1995
-----------------------------------------------------

Asterix and the Great Crossing

Asterix and the Great Crossing / text by Goscinny ; drawings by Uderzo ; translated by Anthea Bell and Derek Hockridge. -- London : Hodder & Stoughton, 1976. -- 48 p. : col. ill. ; 29 cm. -- "A Dargaud presentation." -- Translation of: La Grande Traversée. -- For a list of English-language Asterix titles see An Asterix Adventure. -- Call no.: PN6747.U3A9213 1976

Summary: The ox carts from Lutetia are on strike, so there's no fresh fish in the village. Nobody really remembers how to fish, but Asterix and Obelix decide to try. They set out in an old boat during a storm, and are soon lost. The next morning there's no sign of land, but a pirate ship comes by and they raid it for food. Another storm blows them west, and their boat sinks. Asterix and Obelix swim to land, guessing successively that they might be in Gaul, Thrace, Crete, and Iberia. They interact with Indians and go hunting, and the Chief wants Obelix to marry his daughter. This makes it necessary to flee, and some lost Vikings come along just in time. The Vikings take Asterix and Obelix home as prisoners to prove they've been to a New World, but when they get back nobody believes them because the prisoners are Gauls. With other Gaulish prisoners, Asterix and Obelix escape from the Vikings and return to Gaul, without ever figuring out where they've been.

This summary is from European Comics in English Translation (Jefferson, NC : McFarland & Company, 2002). Used with permission.


Other English-language editions:
Asterix and the Great Crossing / text by Goscinny ; drawings by Uderzo ; translated by Anthea Bell and Derek Hockridge. -- London : Hodder Dargaud, 1978. -- 48 p. : col. ill. ; 29 cm. -- "Book 16". -- Call no.: PN6747.U3A9213 1978

Asterix and the Great Crossing / text by Goscinny ; drawings by Uderzo ; translated by Anthea Bell and Derek Hockridge. -- Montreal : Dargaud Canada, 1981. -- 48 p. : ill. ; 29 cm. -- Call no.: PN6747.U3A9213 1981

-----------------------------------------------------
Asterix and the Great Crossing.
   Asterix Conquers America : the book of the film /
   translated by Anthea Bell and Derek Hockridge ; text
   adapted by Albert Uderzo. -- London : Hodder Children's
   Books, 1995. -- 48 p. : col. ill. ; 29 cm. -- (Asterix ;
   bk. 34) -- 'This book is based on the film "Asterix
   Conquers America" ; The film is adapted from the book
   "Asterix and the Great Crossing."' -- At head of title:
   Goscinny and Uderzo present an Asterix adventure. -- Format
   is text illustrated with cels from the animated film. --
   Call no.: PN6747.U3C5513 1995
-----------------------------------------------------

Asterix and the Great Divide

Asterix and the Great Divide / written and illustrated by Uderzo ; translated by Anthea Bell and Derek Hockridge. -- London : Hodder and Stoughton, 1982. -- 48 p. : col. ill. ; 29 cm. -- Translation of: Le Grand Fossé. -- For a list of English-language Asterix titles see An Asterix Adventure. -- Call no.: PN6747.U3A9513 1982

Summary: A Gaulish village has been cut in half by a deep ditch. Chief Cleverdix rules the left bank by unanimous vote, and Chief Majestix rules the right bank by divine right. Cleverdix has a son, Histrionix, and Majestix has a daughter, Melodrama. The two young people yearn for a united village, and for each other. Majestix's evil henchman Codfix speaks privately to Majestix offering to bring in the Roman army to unite the village with Majestix as its sole chief. All Codfix asks in return is the hand of Melodrama in marriage, once the deed is done. Majestix agrees. Melodrama overhears and tells Histrionix. Learning this from his son, Cleverdix sends to his old friend Vitalstatistix for help. Asterix, Obelix, and Getafix are soon on the way to intervene. Codfix goes to the Romans and offers the left half of the village as slaves. When the Romans arrive at the village to get the slaves, Majestix balks, not having known that selling his countrymen was part of the deal. The Romans then enslave Majestix and the right bank instead, and march them away. In the Roman camp, the new slaves are not cooperative. Asterix, Obelix and Getafix offer themselves as replacement slaves and are accepted with the help of a healing and feel-good potion that Getafix administers. Codfix is secretly watching this exchange, and steals the vial of healing potion. The first thing Getafix does is cook up a cauldron of magic potion, calling it soup. The Romans are suspicious and won't try any until all the Gauls have sampled it. By then the cauldron is empty, and the slaves all go home leaving the Romans stacked in disorderly piles around their own camp. Codfix restores all the Romans with the stolen healing potion, and they march toward the village. Getafix has made another cauldron of the super-strength potion in case the Romans return, but before the battle starts Codfix sneaks in and steals it, feeding it to the Romans. When the Romans attack, the danger of ingesting both potions is soon revealed: The Romans puff up like beach balls and are great fun to bounce around. When they deflate they are reduced to being a few inches tall, and Dogmatix chases them away. During the fighting Codfix has kidnapped Melodrama for ransom, but she is rescued by Histrionix. Codfix is given to the Romans as a slave. The competing chiefs fight hand to hand for the chieftainship of the whole village, but the result is inconclusive, and Histrionix is elected chief. The ditch is filled with water and a bridge is built. The closing banquet is called the 25th, as this is the 25th Asterix story and the first one both written and drawn by Uderzo.

This summary is from European Comics in English Translation (Jefferson, NC : McFarland & Company, 2002). Used with permission.

-----------------------------------------------------

Asterix and the Laurel Wreath

Asterix and the Laurel Wreath / text by Goscinny ; drawings by Uderzo ; translated by Anthea Bell and Derek Hockridge. -- London : Hodder Dargaud, 1976. -- 48 p. : col. ill. ; 29 cm. -- Translation of: Les Lauriers de Cesar. -- "Book 13". -- For a list of English-language Asterix titles see An Asterix Adventure. -- Call no.: PN6747.U3A8813 1976

Summary: Chief Vitalstatistix and his wife Impedimenta are shopping in Lutetia, with Asterix and Obelix helping carry packages. Impedimenta insists that they visit her brother Homeopathix, with whom Vitalstatistix does not get along. Homeopathix serves them all a classy dinner with condescending remarks, and soon Vitalstatistix is drunk and shouting. He invites Homeopathix to their village, where they will serve a stew seasoned with laurel from Julius Caesar's wreath. Obelix, equally drunk, backs him up. Asterix protests, but ends up going to Rome with Obelix to steal Caesar's wreath. To get into Caesar's palace, they offer themselves for sale through a high-class slave dealer, but are purchased by a rich citizen instead. The Gauls take over the citizen's kitchen and produce an inedible but stimulating dinner, which leads to an all-night party. Their owner stays home the next morning with a hangover, and sends them to a meeting in Caesar's palace in his stead. Once inside the palace, Asterix and Obelix are arrested and thrown in the dungeon on suspicion of plotting to kill Caesar. The Gauls break out of the dungeon in the night, but fail to find the wreath, so they break back in. They then have themselves convicted and taken to the Circus Maximus to be fed to the lions. They expect Caesar to be there with his wreath on, but he isn't there. Caesar is out of town, but returning the next day for a triumphal procession. Asterix and Obelix bribe the slave who is assigned to hold the laurel wreath in the chariot. They pull a switch, and Caesar ends up wearing parsley on his head. Back home, Homeopathix comes to dinner but complains about the meat in the stew.

This summary is from European Comics in English Translation (Jefferson, NC : McFarland & Company, 2002). Used with permission.


Another English-language edition:
Asterix and the Laurel Wreath / text by Goscinny ; drawings by Uderzo ; translated by Anthea Bell and Derek Hockridge. -- Montreal : Dargaud Canada, 1980. -- 48 p. : col. ill. ; 29 cm. -- Call no.: PN6747.U3A8813 1980
-----------------------------------------------------

Asterix and the Magic Carpet

Asterix and the Magic Carpet / written and illustrated by Uderzo ; translated by Anthea Bell and Derek Hockridge. -- London : Hodder and Stoughton, 1988. -- 48 p. : col. ill. ; 30 cm. -- Translation of: Astérix chez Rahazade. -- For a list of English-language Asterix titles see An Asterix Adventure. -- Call no.: PN6747.U3A9813 1988

Summary: The Gauls enjoy a banquet in their village, which has been rebuilt on the old plan by the Romans after its destruction in the previous adventure. Cacofonix the Bard sings a few bars, and a thunderstorm manifests, knocking the fakir Watziznehm and his flying carpet out of the sky. Watziznehm has come from India to ask for help. It has been a dry year and the Ganges is nothing but mud. The Guru Hoodunnit has decreed that if it doesn't rain in 1,001 hours the Princess Orinjade must be sacrificed to the gods. Watziznehm wants Cacofonix to come and sing for them, as his fame as a rainmaker has spread even to India. Asterix and Obelix are told off to join the expedition, and the four leave via carpet. Obelix insists on frequent stops for food and comedy. The carpet gets a hole in it over Persia, and they crash-land. The Persians won't work on a carpet they didn't sell, but the Gauls save the Persian weavers from Scythian pirates and thereby earn a new rug. They arrive at the Rajah's palace in time, but Cacofonix has laryngitis. The local prescription is to soak overnight in a bath of elephant milk and elephant dung, from which a reeking Cacofonix is kidnapped during the night, on Guru Hoodunnit's orders. Dogmatix is able to track down the unfortunate bard, but by then the time is nearly up so the Gauls decide to forget the rain and just rescue the princess. When Cacofonix gets a swig of magic potion for this purpose, his voice comes back and he sings a lovely rainstorm.

This summary is from European Comics in English Translation (Jefferson, NC : McFarland & Company, 2002). Used with permission.

-----------------------------------------------------

Asterix and the Normans

Asterix and the Normans / text by Goscinny ; drawings by Uderzo ; translated by Anthea Bell and Derek Hockridge. -- Montreal : Dargaud Canada, 1981. -- 48 p. : col. ill. ; 29 cm. -- Translation of: Astérix et les Normands. -- For a list of English-language Asterix titles see An Asterix Adventure. -- Call no.: PN6747.U3A7913 1981


Summary: Justforkix, the wild city-bred nephew of the chief, is sent to the village of the Gauls to be made a man of. Justforkix drives a fast Italian chariot and plays rock music, and upsets many of the older villagers. Justforkix likes the music produced by the bard Cacofonix, however, and recommends that he should go to Lutetia for an audience that will appreciate him. Meanwhile, in the far north the Normans are pondering a contradiction. They think they know everything, but they don't know the meaning of fear. What's more, they've heard that fear gives you wings, and they'd like to be able to fly. They decide to mount an expedition southwards to make up for this lack. Asterix, Obelix, and Justforkix are on the beach when the Viking ship comes into view. The sober Asterix says they should go tell the rest of the village. Obelix wants to wade right out and take care of them. Justforkix is terrified and runs screaming back to the village. Nobody in the village is particularly concerned about the Normans, beyond making sure that everybody has a fair chance at throwing one or more of them back into the sea if they try to land. The Normans set up tents on the beach, and the two camps do some reconnaissance. Most of the Gauls know as little about fear as the Normans do, but just before giving the trip up as a waste of time the Normans discover Justforkix, an expert on fear. Justforkix decides to scoot back to Lutetia where it's safe, but the Normans kidnap him on the way. Justforkix refuses to frighten them so they can fly, so they stake him down for the night so he won't fly away himself. Asterix and Obelix are soon battling the Normans on the beach, and a Roman patrol arrives with orders to keep the peace. When the fun is over, the Norman chief explains why they've come. Leaving Asterix as a hostage, Obelix goes back to the village to get the Cacofonix the bard. Cacofonix has left for Lutetia to find his audience, as Justforkix had recommended, so it takes some time for Obelix to retrieve him. At the last minute, when Justforkix is about to be forced to demonstrate his flying ability from the top of a cliff, Obelix and Cacofonix arrive. Cacofonix gives a concert, and by the third number the Normans are begging for mercy, with stomachs churning and teeth chattering. Asterix explains that what they are feeling is "fear." The Normans then try to fly off the cliff themselves, swim for their ship and sail fearfully away.

This summary is from European Comics in English Translation (Jefferson, NC : McFarland & Company, 2002). Used with permission.


Other English-language editions:
Asterix and the Normans / text by Goscinny ; drawings by Uderzo ; translated by Anthea Bell and Derek Hockridge. -- 3rd ed. -- New York : Macmillan, 1987. -- 48 p. : col. ill. ; 28 cm. -- Imprint on title page: Dargaud Publishing International. -- Call no.: PN6747.U3A7913 1987

Asterix and the Normans / text by Goscinny ; drawings by Uderzo ; translated by Anthea Bell and Derek Hockridge. -- 3rd ed. -- New York : Macmillan, 1987. -- 48 p. : col. ill. ; 28 cm. -- Imprint on title page: Dargaud Publishing International. -- Call no.: PN6747.U3A7913 1987

-----------------------------------------------------

Asterix and the Roman Agent

Asterix and the Roman Agent / text by Goscinny ; drawings by Uderzo ; translated by Anthea Bell and Derek Hockridge. -- Montreal : Dargaud Canada, 1981. -- 48 p. : col. ill. ; 29 cm. -- Translation of: La Zizanie. -- For a list of English-language Asterix titles see An Asterix Adventure. -- Call no.: PN6747.U3A8513 1981

Summary: The Romans brainstorm for a new way to try conquering the Gaulish village of Asterix and Obelix. Perhaps if they can promote enough discord within the village the Gauls will destroy themselves. A troublemaker named Tortuous Convolvulus is brought out of prison for a demonstration, and has the Roman administrators fighting among themselves within minutes. He gets the job, and is offered money and his freedom if he can neutralize the Gauls. The first thing Convolvulus does is present a fancy vase as a gift to Asterix, calling him the "most important man in the village," within the hearing of Chief Vitalstatistix. Soon everyone is fighting about who's more important. Next Convolvulus steps into Asterix's house, and comes out thanking him loudly for a meal. Nobody believes that he didn't really eat there, and pretty soon gossip has it that Asterix has sold the secret for the magic potion to the Romans. Some Roman soldiers overhear the Gauls talking, and return to camp demanding their share. Convolvulus sets up a charade for Gaulish spies to see, further convincing them that the potion is in Roman hands. Most of the Romans are fooled by the charade as well. Finally when Vitalstatistix won't deny that he thinks Asterix has sold their secret, Asterix, Obelix and Getafix decide to leave the village. They visit Convolvulus and tell him he's won, and that they're leaving. Then the three Gauls climb a tree to watch. When the Romans leave to attack, Asterix and Obelix grab their vat of phony potion and run back to their village with it, to show the Gauls that it isn't real. Everybody is sorry and figures out they've behaved badly. Getafix starts brewing another batch of potion, while the Roman garrisons gather for a mass attack. The battle is brief, and the Romans are soundly defeated. Asterix walks out on the battlefield and gives back the expensive vase, thanking Convolvulus for making the victory possible. The Roman soldiers hear that and ship him back to Rome in chains. The village is soon back to its normal level of insane squabbling.

This summary is from European Comics in English Translation (Jefferson, NC : McFarland & Company, 2002). Used with permission.


Bibliography:
Index entry (p. 219) in Comics, Comix & Graphic Novels, by Roger Sabin (London : Phaidon, 1996). -- Call no.: PN6710.S24 1996
-----------------------------------------------------

Asterix and the Secret Weapon

Asterix and the Secret Weapon / written and illustrated by Albert Uderzo ; translated by Anthea Bell and Derek Hockridge. -- London : Hodder & Stoughton, 1991. -- 48 p. : col. ill. ; 30 cm. -- Translation of: La Rose et le Glaive. -- For a list of English-language Asterix titles see An Asterix Adventure. -- Call no.: PN6747.G6S3513 1991

Summary: The women of the village are dissatisfied with the schooling their bard Cacofonix is providing their children, and have hired a woman bard to take his place. Cacofonix is insulted and leaves for his retreat in the forest. The new bard is named Bravura, and she wears pants. At the party to welcome her, the villagers request a song and she accompanies herself on a drum, saying the harp is just for fans of early music. Meanwhile in Rome, Caesar has trained and dispatched a hundred women warriors to be a secret weapon against the Gauls, whose famous gallantry will supposedly prevent them from fighting against women. In the village, Bravura is preaching feminism and soon all of the women are wearing pants, and the men are camping in the woods with Cacofonix. The secret weapon arrives, and Asterix and Bravura, both Gauls after all, get together on a plan. In the forest, Cacofonix starts singing whenever the Roman women approach the village. This causes severe rainstorms and panics all the animals, unnerving the warriors as well. When the secret weapon finally attacks the village, they are met not with armed resistance but by a shopping mall with imported jewelry, "frillies," hairdressers, perfume, fashions and real leather handbags. The Roman women head back to Rome in their new civilian clothes to open shops, and Bravura decides to leave as well.

This summary is from European Comics in English Translation (Jefferson, NC : McFarland & Company, 2002). Used with permission.

-----------------------------------------------------

Asterix and the Soothsayer

Asterix and the Soothsayer / text by Goscinny ; drawings by Uderzo ; translated by Anthea Bell and Derek Hockridge. -- Montreal : Dargaud Canada, 1978. -- 48 p. : col. ill. ; 29 cm. -- Translation of: Le Devin. -- For a list of English-language Asterix titles see An Asterix Adventure. -- Call no.: PN6747.U3A8913 1978

Summary: During a thunderstorm, a stranger named Prolix seeks refuge in the Gaulish village, and says he is a soothsayer. Only Asterix expresses skepticism about Prolix's ability to tell the future. The rest of the villagers want to know whether the storm means the sky is about to fall, and Prolix offers to do a reading. He needs the entrails of an animal, and keeps asking to read Dogmatix, but settles for one of the fishmonger's fish. The sky, he determines, will not fall, and "when the storm is over the weather will improve." The villagers are very impressed. Prolix leaves the village blaming the skepticism of Asterix, and sets up camp in a clearing in the forest. Soon all the villagers are sneaking out to bring him presents and ask for readings. After a few days the Romans find Prolix, and reveal that Caesar has ordered all Gaulish soothsayers arrested as security risks. Prolix then proclaims himself a fake, but can't prove it. The Centurion says if he's really a con man he can talk the Gauls out of their village, and thereby avoid being arrested. Prolix returns to the village and tells the people a curse is upon them, and that they must flee because air will soon be polluted and they won't be able to breathe. The villagers take their boats and move to an offshore island, except for Asterix and Obelix who hide in the forest to see what's going to happen. The Romans march into the deserted village, and send a message to Caesar that the conquest of Gaul is complete. Getafix comes back from an annual conference, and with the help of Asterix and Obelix brews up a batch of air pollution that makes the soothsayer's prediction come true. The Romans leave and the Gauls return. In the Roman camp the Romans beg Prolix for more and more predictions. To prove he is not a soothsayer, the Gauls stage a raid on the Roman camp that Prolix does not predict, and beat everybody up. When Caesar sends an envoy in response to the Centurion's message, the Gauls promptly beat them up and the status quo is restored all around.

This summary is from European Comics in English Translation (Jefferson, NC : McFarland & Company, 2002). Used with permission.


Bibliography:
"Le Devin" / Jacques Glénat-Guttin. p. 19 in Schtroumpf : les Cahiers de la Bande Dessinée, no. 13 (1972). -- (A Propos de Quelques Albums) -- Review of an Asterix album by Uderzo & Goscinny. -- Call no.: PN6745.S37no.13
-----------------------------------------------------
Asterix and the Soothsayer.
   Operation Getafix : the Book of the Film : Goscinny and
   Uderzo present an Asterix adventure / translated by Anthea
   Bell and Derek Hockridge. -- London : Hodder and Stoughton,
   1990. -- 47 p. : col. ill. ; 29 cm. -- (Asterix ; book 31)
   -- Based on the film Asterix and the Big Fight (Le Coup du
   Menhir) "written by Yannik Voigt from the books Asterix and
   the Soothsayer and Asterix and the Big Fight." -- Format is
   text illustrated with cels from the animated film. -- Call
   no.: PN6747.U3C613 1990
-----------------------------------------------------
Astérix and the Universal Civil War.
   "Footnotes and Commentaries : Astérix and the Universal
   Civil War" / by Paulette Carroll. p. 23-25 in The Comic
   Reader, no. 164 (Jan. 1979). -- (European Comics). -- "Part
   one: A Small Step for a Man." -- Call no.: PN6700.C6no.164
-----------------------------------------------------
Asterix and the Vikings.
   Goscinny and Uderzo present Asterix and the Vikings : the
   Book of the Film / translated by Anthea Bell. -- London :
   Orion, 2006. -- 64 p. : col. ill. ; 29 cm. -- (An Asterix
   Adventure ; 34) -- Translation of: Astérix et les Vikings.
   -- "Meet Chief Timandahaf the Viking, his fierce warriors
   and his daughter Abba, as Asterix and Obelix do when the
   Vikings visit Gaul to learn the meaning of fear. For they
   believe fear will lend them wings, and they'd love to fly.
   Carried off to the frozen North, trendy young Justforkix
   from Lutetia claims to know all about it. But will he or
   someone else put the Vikings to flight?" -- Call no.:
   PN6747.U3V513 2006
-----------------------------------------------------
Astérix and the World Cup (France 1998).
   "Let's Party! Astérix and the World Cup (France 1998)" /
   James Steel. p. 201-218 in The Francophone Bande Dessinée
   (Amsterdam : Rodopi, 2005). -- Includes bibliographical
   references. -- Call no.: PN6745.F66 2005
-----------------------------------------------------
"Asterix Appeal Denied" p. 28 in The Comics Journal, no. 207
   (Sept. 1998). -- (News Watch) -- Dargaud loses right to
   publish first 25 Asterix books. -- Call no.:
   PN6700.C62no.207
-----------------------------------------------------

Asterix at the Olympic Games

Asterix at the Olympic Games / text by Goscinny ; drawings by Uderzo ; translated by Anthea Bell and Derek Hockridge. -- London : Hodder Dargaud, 1974. -- 48 p. : col. ill. ; 29 cm. -- (An Asterix Adventure) -- Translation of: Astérix aux Jeux Olympiques. -- For a list of English-language Asterix titles see An Asterix Adventure. -- Call no.: PN6747.U3 A8213 1974

Summary: The Romans in the little camp of Aquarium are exulting because their champion, Gluteus Maximus, has been selected to compete in the Olympics. Bursting with self-confidence, Gluteus goes out to do some sprints in the woods. Obelix sees him running by, and runs up alongside him to ask what the hurry is. Asterix catches up and tells Obelix not to bother the Roman, and both Gauls then speed on ahead. Gluteus, who thought he was the fastest man in the world, begins to lose his edge. Gluteus then throws a javelin high over the trees, and is hit by a whole tree in return. The javelin hit Obelix, and he has returned the compliment. Asterix apologizes for his friend. Gluteus then brags about his boxing, but calls Obelix fat, and gets knocked up into a tree for his trouble. Gluteus returns to Aquarium no longer feeling like a champion, and takes up a broom to sweep the camp. The commanding officer visits the Gaulish village and asks the Gauls to lay off, because the Olympics are important. Only Getafix the Druid has even heard of the Olympics, but when he explains, they all want to compete. The Romans then say that only Greeks and Romans can be in the Olympics, and others are not allowed. The Gauls are downcast briefly, but then realize that by Roman definition they are a conquered people and therefore part of the Roman Empire. The Gauls hire a boat and head for Athens. After some days of tourism, the teams travel to Olympia. The night before the games, the Romans discover the rule against artificial stimulants. Deprived of their magic potions, the Gauls do not win, though neither do the demoralized Romans. The Greeks then set up a "Romans only" footrace, figuring that unless the Romans win something it will be bad for the economic future of the games. The Gauls trick the Romans into stealing some magic potion, so that the Romans win but are disqualified. Asterix then feels sorry for Gluteus Maximus, and gives him his "palm of victory," which Gluteus presents to Caesar for a promotion.

This summary is from European Comics in English Translation (Jefferson, NC : McFarland & Company, 2002). Used with permission.


Another English-language edition:
Asterix at the Olympic Games / text by Goscinny ; drawings by Uderzo ; translated by Anthea Bell and Derek Hockridge. -- Leicester : Knight, 1975. -- 94 p. : ill. ; 18 cm. -- "A Dargaud presentation." -- A small paperback edition, formatted sideways. -- Call no.: PN6747.U3 A8213 1975
-----------------------------------------------------
Astérix aux Jeux Olympiques / texte de René Goscinny ; dessins
   d'Albert Uderzo. -- Paris : Hachette, 1999. -- 48 p. : col.
   ill. ; 30 cm. -- (Une Aventure d'Astérix ; 12) -- Call no.:
   PN6747.U3A82 1999
-----------------------------------------------------
Astérix aux Jeux Olympiques. Dutch.
   Asterix en de Olympische Spelen / tekst, R. Goscinny ;
   tekeningen, A. Uderzo. -- Brussel : Dargaud Benelux ;
   Haarlem : Oberon, 1968. -- 48 p. col. ill. ; 29 cm. -- (Een
   Avontuur van Asterix de Gallier ; 14) -- Translation of:
   Astérix aux jeux olympiques. -- Call no.: PN6747.U3A8219
   1968
-----------------------------------------------------
Astérix aux Jeux Olympiques. English.
   Asterix at the Olympic Games / text by Goscinny ; drawings
   by Uderzo ; translated by Anthea Bell and Derek Hockridge.
   -- London : Hodder Dargaud, 1974. -- 48 p. : col. ill. ; 29
   cm. -- (An Asterix Adventure) -- Translation of: Astérix
   aux jeux olympiques. -- Call no.: PN6747.U3 A8213 1974
-----------------------------------------------------
Astérix aux Jeux Olympiques. English.
   Asterix at the Olympic Games / text by Goscinny ; drawings
   by Uderzo ; translated by Anthea Bell and Derek Hockridge.
   -- Leicester : Knight, 1975. -- 94 p. : ill. ; 18 cm. -- "A
   Dargaud presentation." -- Translation of: Astérix aux jeux
   olympiques. -- Call no.: PN6747.U3 A8213 1975
-----------------------------------------------------
Astérix aux Jeux Olympiques. German.
   Asterix bei den Olympischen Spielen / Text, Goscinny ;
   Zeichnungen, Uderzo. -- Stuttgart : Ehapa-Verlag, 1972. --
   48 p. ; col. ill. ; 29 cm. -- (Grosser Asterix ; Bd. 12) --
   Translation of Astérix aux jeux Olympiques. -- Call no.:
   PN6747.U3A8215 1972
-----------------------------------------------------
On down the list

This segment last edited February 15, 2011